Don’t Give Up, Get SMART

Sun up to sun up, NMCB 3 demonstrates commitment to preventing sexual assault

The holiday season and the first month of 2017 are behind us, and store shelves are now overflowing with heart shaped chocolates and cards. This may put you in a frame of mind to think about the relationships in your life, but what about your relationship with yourself? By this time your New Year’s resolutions may be starting to give way to work or family demands (or both), draining your motivation and dampening your outlook. Rather than shrugging it off and disappointedly telling yourself that you can try again next year for the umpteenth year in a row, put a little thought into how you can get back on track. Ask yourself not only what you want to accomplish, but by when, how you’ll do it and how you’ll track it, and why you’re doing it. In other words, it’s time to get SMART:

Specific: Getting specific with your goals can help motivate action, upping your chances of success. For example, if your original New Year’s resolution was to read more—one of this year’s most popular resolutions[1]—optimize that goal by defining exactly what you’re working toward. “I will read one book per month” is a specific goal (and one that can help you strengthen your self-care routine too).

Measurable: You can track your progress toward reading because you’ve identified a quantity (in the above case, aiming for one book each month). Measurable goals can help move you in the right direction by keeping you motivated and aware, and helping you define achievement or reassess your approach.

Attainable: Set yourself up for success by making sure you have the right resources in place to achieve your resolution, including the right environment and mindset. If one of your resolutions is to eat two to three more servings of fruits and vegetables a day this year, are you willing to make these foods more accessible than the less healthy options in your kitchen or snack stash at work? Repeat your goal to yourself out loud, starting with “I will….” If you feel more committed to the idea but not the steps that you’ve outlined to get there, reassess. An attainable goal is one that may take some work, but through dedication and accountability can be achieved.

Realistic: It’s good to have high goals, but training for a marathon in one month when you have never run before is unrealistic and may be unhealthy. By taking into account your timeframe, resources, mindset and priorities; you can tweak this goal to work for you, rather than against you. To say “I will run my 1st marathon by December 2017” may be more realistic and attainable. Remember, there’s no benefit in sacrificing one area of your health (mental or physical) for another.

Timely: Anchor your goals within a time frame so that you can define success and stay accountable. Sometimes our best work is completed under a deadline, but remember, the other SMART rules apply (hint: attainable and realistic)!

Setting bite-sized SMART goals can help you achieve your overall resolution by making it easier to see progress and building healthier habits.  Examples may include:

  • I will swap one cup of coffee for eight ounces of water each day for one month.
  • I will walk one mile per day for two weeks and add one-quarter mile every two weeks.
  • I will deposit $25 each week into an Individual Retirement Account (a goal that you can automate for guaranteed success).

For accountability, keep a daily log to track your progress and setbacks (especially helpful if journaling is one of your resolutions). Setbacks are inevitable, so keep them in perspective – some days will be more challenging than others and you’re doing this to better yourself, not belittle yourself. You can also get an accountability partner with similar goals so that you can keep each other motivated and stay strong together. Don’t forget to celebrate successes big or small, but do so in a way that doesn’t conflict with your progress. Rewarding yourself with a chocolate cake for reaching a weight loss milestone won’t help your waistline in the long run and may lead to guilt.

Make 2017 your year to make things happen. Work SMARTer, not harder!

About the Author

LT Pamela Gregory, OPNAV N17 Nutrition Program Manager, is a Registered Dietitian with nine years’ experience in counseling a wide variety of clientele on nutrition and health-related diseases/ topics. LT Gregory uses a functional nutrition approach to assist clients in their treatment phase.

[1] http://www.nbcnews.com/business/consumer/2017-new-year-s-resolutions-most-popular-how-stick-them-n701891

How Stress Impacts Your Heart Health

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Heart disease refers to numerous problems which are often related to plaque build-up in the heart’s arteries (atherosclerosis)[1]. There are a variety of risk factors for heart disease, some of which may be out of your control, such as genetics and age. Other risk factors – such as lack of exercise, an unhealthy diet or unchecked stress – can be minimized through lifestyle changes. That’s good news considering that heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States.

Stress is a natural reaction; it is the body’s way of coping with a perceived threat. As part of the ‘fight or flight’ response, stress signals the body to produce more energy by elevating the heart rate, increasing production of LDL cholesterol and blood glucose. This response should subside when the perceived threat (stressor) is no longer present. However, when we’re unable to unwind or are exposed to stress for a prolonged amount of time, the short and long term effects can be damaging. Stress can lead to poor eating choices, missed workouts and a lack of sleep. Without action, this combination of factors may lead to high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes.

According to the 2013 Fleet and Marine Corps Health Risk Assessment, only 12 percent of active duty Navy respondents and 13 percent of active duty Marine respondents indicated that they experienced work stress. However, those numbers increased as time away from home station increased. To help navigate stress, follow these tips:

Not all risk factors can be avoided, but exercising Controllability when it comes to navigating stress and making lifestyle choices can reduce risk. Small acts can help you do your part to protect your heart, improve your health and enhance your military readiness.

February is Heart Health Month. The Every Sailor, Every Day campaign thanks Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center for providing the above information, which can be found in their fact sheets “Heart Health: Risk Factors and Lifestyle Choices” and “Help your Heart, Help your Life” located in the February HPW Toolbox.

 

[1] What is Cardiovascular Disease? (2017, January 10). Retrieved from http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Caregiver/Resources/WhatisCardiovascularDisease/What-is-Cardiovascular-Disease_UCM_301852_Article.jsp#.WJns3dXR_9c

Fleet Feature: “Yoga for the Mind, Body and Soul”

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To read “Yoga for the Mind, Body and Soul” in its original form and learn more about Senior Chief Terrish Bilbrey, click here.

In today’s competitive, fast-paced Navy environment, tending to your own basic needs can sometimes take a backseat to getting the job done and getting ahead. Reactions to stress can take various forms, and when left unchecked or unacknowledged, they can take a toll on emotional and physical health.  This is something that one Sailor attached to aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) learned firsthand. Senior Chief Terrish Bilbrey, Operations Department Leading Chief Petty Officer, recently shared how one self-care practice helped her make positive changes in her life and pay it forward.

“I came into the Navy with this really badass attitude” Bilbrey said in a related John C. Stennis (CVN 74) blog post. She served 10 straight years of sea duty, during which time her career flourished. She was selected for Sailor of the Quarter twice in one year, as well as Pacific Fleet Sailor of the Year. She advanced to chief on her first try. Yet difficulties in Bilbrey’s personal life, in combination with a childhood that led her to seek achievements to validate her self-worth, began weighing on her.  Without an outlet, the stress and her need to succeed began to lead her to make destructive decisions.

After some lows, Bilbrey described what led to a turning point in her life: yoga. Though she already led an active lifestyle, she turned to this self-care practice to help her regroup, decompress, and self-reflect. “I started to realize that I would have these sensations of forgiveness and I would start to let go of some feelings and anger and all of those things that I held inside,” she shared. Bilbrey learned to view challenges as inspiration, asking herself what she can learn from them rather than allowing the presence of challenges to negatively influence her.

Eventually, Senior Chief Bilbrey went on to pursue her yoga teaching certificate while stationed at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to share with her shipmates all of the positive impacts that the practice continues to have on her life. She currently teaches yoga classes to her Stennis shipmates with a goal of helping them understand that they are perfect the way they are. “I don’t want anyone else to feel that they are not worthy because that is the way I felt for 30 years of my life,” Bilbrey says. Yoga has brought Bilbrey a new sense of clarity and purpose for her own life. Beyond her current teaching, she hopes to build upon what she’s started by helping others realize their potential through mindfulness and lifestyle changes.

Good self-care can be challenging to adopt or maintain, often due to demands on time, energy or putting others needs before your own. As this New Year begins, find an accessible personal practice that you can work into your routine to help you recharge both physically and emotionally. Whether it be yoga, running, journaling, or connecting with spirituality, your commitment to yourself not only benefits you—it enables you to be there for others, stay present during challenges and stay mission-ready. Bilbrey chose yoga, and now she believes that “we have the ability to design our life, the ability to take whatever it is you dream of… and make anything happen in your life.”

Resolve to Reframe your Money-Mindset for 2017

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2017 is officially underway, as are millions of New Year’s resolutions. According to the University of Scranton, more than one third of resolutions made are money-related[1]. Despite the good intentions, motivation and ambition, 25 percent of all resolutions fail to make it past week one. What’s the deal?

The process of setting goals for the New Year can be a time to reflect on successes and opportunities, motivating positive and meaningful change. But it’s easy to get caught up in feeling obligated to solve all of the issues in our lives in 365 days through a few unrealistic resolutions, which can ultimately contribute to feelings of failure, decreased self-worth and added stress. Coincidentally, these are not things that we typically associate with financial prosperity. When it comes to your financial goals for 2017, focus on making money your ally rather than your adversary. Sure, you may want to double your nest-egg, triple your wealth and eliminate all debt by December 31, 2017 – but are these realistic moves for you? And at what costs do these achievements come with?

Rather than resolving to solve it all, commit to reframing your money-mindset this year through a few small acts to guide your decisions, offered by our financial expert Stacy Livingstone-Hoyte.

  • Regain a sense of control. Perhaps your money-resolution is motivated by the unexpected lack of green in your wallet or accounts post-holidays, which can leave anyone feeling a little blue. Rather than resigning yourself to a hopeless financial outlook, tackle holiday spending with a level-head. Gather up your receipts (paper or emails from online transactions) so that you can not only get an accurate assessment of what you spent, but so that you can ensure that your bank and credit card statements are accurate when they start to populate your inbox. Once you’ve taken this step (and forgiven yourself for any overspending), create or modify your budget for the New Year so that you can reasonably reduce your debt or revive your savings without creating a cycle of debt for the future. Military OneSource, your local Fleet and Family Support Center and militarysaves.org offer budgeting tools to help you balance payments, savings, investments and spending with peace of mind.
  • Define what financial well-being actually means to you. It’s not all about paying the bills and saving for the future. Even the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau includes being “able to make choices that allow for enjoyment of life” in their definition of financial well-being. Achieving all three requires some balance and a long-term perspective, rather than solely focusing your sights on short-term achievements. As you refresh your budget for the New Year, include a discretionary spending allowance for each month accounting for daily necessities such as groceries and gas, as well as a reasonable amount for entertainment (a night out, a family outing, exploring your next overseas port-of-call, etc.). Doing so will help you plan for blind-spots that may throw your budget off track. You deserve to enjoy all that your career has earned you – just be honest with yourself in examining how you do so and
  • Apply some of your holiday spending tricks throughout the year. During the year you’ll likely find yourself scrambling to buy a few gifts for anniversaries, birthdays or celebrations. Set reminders in your phone 30 days in advance of each event so that you have enough time to search and budget for a gift. When determining your gift, keep your focus on the meaning behind your relationship with the person rather than giving them the most expensive thing your remaining discretionary funds will allow. Non-material gifts—perhaps giving a memento from a memorable duty station to a shipmate celebrating advancement—can be more valuable than anything you can swipe a card to purchase. Outside of gift-giving, you can apply a few familiar tips to get your everyday shopping in check as well. Do your research to compare prices, read online reviews and search coupon deals. Don’t forget to make a list and check it twice whenever you head to the store so that you’re not going in for a roll of paper towel and leaving with a new flat screen television!

If you’ve found that by the end of years passed you’re measuring success by how closely you’ve achieved your financial resolutions, it’s time to take a new approach. Start this year with a little gratitude and a positive outlook by committing to “progress rather than perfection” as your 2017 mantra.

[1] New Year’s Resolution Statistics. (n.d.). University of Scranton Journal of Clinical Psychology. Retrieved December 11, 2016, from http://www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statistics/

Connecting with the Spirit of the Season

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“On the first day of Christmas, the season gave to me: one cross-country trip, two white elephant gifts, three treks to the mall, four holiday parties, five credit card bills…”

That may not be how the original song goes, but if you can relate to this remix then it might be time to push pause and connect with something a little deeper.

The holidays can be a harried, hectic time of year, but it is also a time of hope, goodwill, celebration and renewal. Beneath the frenetic drumbeat of traveling and to-do lists, this is a time when we recognize the best in people and enjoy the rich traditions and unique customs of Christmas, Kwanzaa and Hanukkah to name a few. Whether you are leaving cookies out for Santa, placing candles in the Kinara or lighting a Menorah (or some of each!), try not to let energy spent on gift-giving and merry-making take time away from reflecting on the reason for the season that you identify with the most.

Spirituality can help you cope with stress by connecting you to something bigger than yourself, and it comes in all shapes and sizes. For some, spirituality may come in the form of relationships with shipmates, friends, family, nature, etc. For others, it may come in the form of a relationship with a Higher Power and religious practices. However you choose to express your spirituality, it can create values, beliefs, peace, purpose and connections that give life meaning. Spiritual fitness can increase happiness and well-being, reduce anxiety and depression, promote a positive outlook, mend feelings of moral injury, strengthen personal relationships and help maintain healthy lifestyle choices.

This FITmas time, take a moment to both reflect on your spiritual fitness and strengthen your bonds with these tips for a more fulfilling holiday season:

  • Be purposeful and find perspective. As Navy Chaplain Andrew Sholtes reflected in his post, “December: a Season of Goodness,” it’s easy to feel obligated to go overboard with shopping, cooking, decorating or pleasing others. Keep these things in perspective by pausing to think about what you’re doing and how it fits within the season’s meaning. Let this meaning guide your actions, rather than trying to please everyone or falling into the traps of commercialism.
  • Put your faith or spirituality into practice. Share thoughts and questions with others who have similar beliefs or can help you gain new perspective, read about spiritual teachings and focus on spiritual fulfillment. Explore your personal beliefs and find the best application for you and/or your family, staying connected to tradition. Give yourself and others the gifts of presence and forgiveness by using the spirit of the holidays to rekindle relationships that may have dwindled, mending differences and moving forward.
  • Make new friends, and keep the old. Another Navy chaplain suggests adding new tools to your toolbox during the holiday season by focusing on connection. Engage in fellowship by surrounding yourself with people when you can. A sense of community can warm even the coldest of moments. Reach out to others and make an effort to create new friendships, expand your circle of family and acquaintances and involve those who may be alone or struggling this season. A great way to alleviate your own struggles is to help others with theirs.

This season has different meaning for each and every one of us, but also common threads that we can share to stay connected. As you seek ways to strengthen your spiritual fitness—which can also include brief breaks for mindfulness practices and embracing the outdoors—remember that help is always available whenever you or others need it. Navy chaplains are always available, offering confidential support and guidance for Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen and their families to help reinforce a sense of connectedness, build spiritual resilience and navigate life’s challenges. Call Navy 311 to request chaplain support in your area by dialing 1-855-NAVY-311.

Keep an eye out for more tips to help you strengthen your Spiritual Fitness this season as we continue to celebrate the 21 Days of Total Sailor FITmas!