Category Archives: Training

Get in on the ACT – Ways to Engage for Suicide Prevention Month 2015

1 small act 3Editor’s Note: The NPC website is currently experiencing technical difficulties. If you have problems accessing resources, please e-mail suicideprevention@navy.mil.

September is Suicide Prevention Month and we have the resources you need to get actively involved in supporting your shipmates this month and throughout the year. Building on the Every Sailor, Every Day campaign, the 21st Century Sailor Office’s Suicide Prevention Branch, OPNAV N171, is introducing the message “1 Small ACT” during this year’s observance. The little things that we can do as shipmates, leaders and family members every day can make a big difference in the lives of others.

While suicide prevention is an ongoing effort, this month’s observance is the perfect time to catalyze engagement and encourage your shipmates to support one another through life’s challenges. You can get started today by participating in the 1 Small ACT Photo Gallery on our Navy Operational Stress Control Facebook Page (www.facebook.com/navstress) to illustrate practical applications of the 1 Small ACT message. By contributing to the photo gallery, you can demonstrate your commitment to supporting every Sailor, every day by highlighting simple ways to make a difference, inspire hope and save a life. Submissions will be accepted through Aug. 31, 2016.

Contributing to the 1 Small ACT Photo Gallery is quick, but the impact can last a lifetime. To participate:

  • Submit a photograph of yourself or your shipmates holding the 1 Small ACT sign (available in our toolkit here or on Navy.mil here), personalized with your example of a small act that can make a difference or save a life. For example, you could write “I will remember to personally thank my Sailors for their contributions to our mission.” Or, “I will speak to my command chaplain before my stress becomes overwhelming.”
  • Send your photo to suicideprevention@navy.mil for review and posting in the photo gallery. In the email, include your command or organization and the small act written on the sign (may be used as caption).
  • Like us on Facebook (facebook.com/navstress) to view and share your image as inspiration to your shipmates, friends and family!

You can also submit your 1 Small ACT photo through the Real Warriors mobile application. The Real Warriors app is an online photo-sharing service that offers peer support for warriors, veterans and military families. Users can upload photos to the Wall, salute others and access 24/7 resources. If you don’t have the sign, just hold up your index finger in the photo, pick an inspirational message (e.g. “Real Strength”) and write your 1 Small ACT as a caption. You can download the app on the Apple App Store or view the Wall on your mobile browser at realstrength.realwarriors.net.

Don’t stop there! Other ways to get involved include:

  • Using the 1 Small ACT a Day calendar from the toolkit (available for download with a free Issuu account here), include examples of simple actions to promote suicide prevention in your command’s Plan of the Day or Plan of the Week notes.
  • Educate five shipmates on five risk factors or warning signs for suicide, and asking them to pass it on.
  • Organize a 1 Small ACT challenge. Encourage your shipmates to perform meaningful acts throughout the month of September and share each on a designated wall in a high-visibility area, using the 1 Small ACT photo gallery sign.
  • Organize a 5K walk/run aboard your ship or installation, using 1 Small ACT as the theme. Have a 1 Small ACT photo station next to the check in table, stocked with printed photo gallery templates from the toolkit and bold markers so that participants can submit their images to the photo gallery (include instructions for submission at the table as well).
  • Post educational content to your command, unit, installation or organization’s social media networks. You can use the sample social media messages in the toolkit or choose your own messaging. Make sure to use the #1SmallACT hashtag!
  • Organize a showing of the “Every Sailor, Every Day” video followed by an open discussion about bystander intervention, peer support and active engagement. Be sure to follow communications guidelines described in the What’s in a Word fact sheet in the toolkit.

The 1 Small ACT Toolkit, available for download here, includes materials such as printable posters, social media graphics and sample messages, talking points, a sample proclamation from the commanding officer and more. Bookmark Navy Suicide Prevention’s webpage, like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more resources to support every Sailor, every day.

What will your small ACT be?

Upcoming Webinar to Recognize Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Month

Recognizing and understanding the factors that place Sailors and Marines at risk for suicide and communicating with one another to connect the dots and take 120604-N-KS651-015action play important roles in suicide prevention and intervention efforts, from the deckplate to leadership levels. The Department of the Navy recognizes September as Suicide Prevention Month, and in 2014, the theme for this observance is “Every Sailor, Every Day.” This month serves as a launch pad to promote suicide prevention resources, continuous engagement in suicide prevention efforts, and overall psychological and emotional well-being throughout the year.

In observance of Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Month, Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center’s Health Promotion and Wellness Department will co-host a webinar with Navy Suicide Prevention Branch (OPNAV N171). Learn more from psychological health experts about the public health approach to suicide prevention. OPNAV N171 will discuss strategies for enhancing your command’s suicide prevention program as well as evidence-based suicide prevention tools.

Participate in the upcoming webinar on September 15, 2014 from 1200-1300 ET. To view the webinar on the day of the event, click on or copy and paste the following link:

https://connect.dco.dod.mil/r5gqvevou2a/

The webinar is intended for command suicide prevention coordinators, transient personnel unit staff, chaplains, first responders, primary care and behavioral health providers, and Navy and Marine Corps health professionals and health educators who can share their resources with the Sailors, Marines, and beneficiaries they support. The webinar is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) to receive up to 1 Category 1 CECH. To register, visit http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/nmcphc/health-promotion/Pages/webinars.aspx.

Meet the Trainers!

Over the past few months, OPNAV N171 has fielded a number of questions abouttraining the recent Operational Stress Control (OSC) training mandate for deploying units and gathered great, tangible feedback. As we make our way around the fleet and to your command, we wanted to take the opportunity to introduce our OSC trainers and answer some of the commonly asked questions.

What is OSC training? Is it new?

Since 2009, stress training has focused on assisting Navy leaders in identifying and applying practical stress navigation tools. Two courses are offered: Navy OSC for Leaders (NAVOSC-Lead) and Deckplate Leader OSC (DPL-OSC). NAV-OSC Lead was designed by warfighters with warfighters in mind, assisting them in assessing individual and unit stress responses while providing tools to help their Sailors better navigate operational stress. While NAVOSC-Lead is targeted for E7 and above, DPL-OSC mirrors this dialogue-led interactive course for mid-level supervisors E4- E6. These courses are a vital part of any command’s efforts to foster a supportive climate, whether preparing for deployment or trying to strengthen readiness and cohesion. As of March 2014, NAVOSC-Lead has been delivered approximately 350 times to 9,000 Sailors, and DPL-OSC has been taught about 320 times to 12,000 Sailors.

How is OSC training delivered?

Both courses are delivered in-person by our Mobile Training Teams (MTTs) at no cost to your command. There are two teams, one based in Norfolk, Va. And the other in San Diego, and each team is comprised of nine individuals. Most of the trainers are Master Training Specialists. The team is mainly comprised of retired military, representing a mix of warfare communities and services, including a retired Army drill sergeant who also happens to be a Navy spouse. The former ranks of these trainers include everything from junior enlisted to chief petty officer.  Combined, the MTTs have a total of 405 years of military experience!

Where is the training held?

Our MTTs know first-hand the stress of being in the Navy and are flexible with operational demands. MTTs travel to you, whether underway or ashore, CONUS or OCONUS, and can work within available training spaces.

How long will training take?

For a unit of 350 Sailors, with proper space and 4-6 MTTs available, training can be completed within 1-2 days. Each course is designed to take about 3-4 hours, with class sizes maxing out at 35 for NAVOSC-Lead and 50 for DPL- OSC.

How should my unit prepare for the training?

The best preparation for OSC training is to attend with an open mind. The training centers around frank discussion among attendees. When leaders talk about what they see as stress-related issues and how course tools could be applied in their commands, OSC becomes more than a concept – it becomes a way of doing business every day. For more information, see the OSC MTT fact sheet. 

How do you schedule training?

MTTs will prioritize scheduling OSC training with all deploying commands to meet the six-month objective mandated in NAVADMIN 262/13.  Commands are then responsible for documenting completion of training in the Fleet Training Management and Planning System (FLTMPS) prior to deployment.

For specific questions, or to schedule OSC training at your command, you can reach our MTTs as follows:

MTT West at (619) 556-6640, or via email at oscmttwest@navy.mil

MTT East at (757) 445-7353, or via email at oscmtteast@navy.mil

Last, and certainly not least, we are excited to announce that we have begun to launch our OSC web site! As we continue to populate the site with static, program-specific information, such as the history of OSC, the Principles of Resilience, Five Core Leader Functions, etc., we will continue to use this blog to provide you with the tools and resources to apply OSC skills to thrive, not just survive, in both your Navy career and personal lives.

Shipmates taking care of shipmates

By: CAPT Kurt Scott

Earlier this month, the world remembered a tragic day in American history — October 12, 2000 — the bombing of the USS Cole (DDG-67). Remembering that day made me reflect on how our world has changed and yet how some things remain steady; like the commitment of shipmates to each other which has never wavered.

Petty Officer 1st Class Daren Jones, Operations Specialist on the USS Cole at the time of the attack, shared his experiences. “I was scared just like everyone else [but] your training kicks in. Everyone acted with the same amount of bravery, the same amount of courage, the same amount of determination. It was amazing.”

Like the training that propelled the USS Cole crew to perform in a time of high-stress and uncertainty, Operational Stress Control (OSC) skills training facilitates conversations about stress awareness and strategies for stress navigation in both oneself and their shipmates.  It’s about having the ‘tools in the toolbox’ for those unexpected moments in both your Navy career and personal life.

Training, while it may feel cumbersome at times, is what keeps our ships and shipmates operating safely in rough seas and calm waters. The recently released NAVADMIN 262/13 requires OSC skills training within six months of deployment after January 1, 2014. MANY commands have already incorporated stress navigation training and tools into their deployments… and have reported great results!

In May 2013, the USS Stout (DDG-55) completed OSC skills training. Now, after more than two months at sea, Shipmates continue to THRIVE with Skipper, CDR Alpigini, reporting “we’re keeping everyone active and being creative about building resilience.  Most importantly, the team has the skills to identify problems amongst each other and knows how to direct Sailors to the right resources like Chaps, Doc, XO, CO, etc.” Learn about Stout’s creative approaches to stress navigation on its Facebook page.

A recent Navy News Service story highlighted the successes aboard the USS Boxer (LHD- 4) where its leadership worked to implement elements of an OSC program. BRAVO ZULU to the crew for recognizing the importance of stress navigation and taking on its very own local initiative, conducted in parallel with the OSC skills training mandate, to leverage local resources and execute the fundamental steps of a successful OSC program. Check out its Facebook page to follow their journey!

Many more ships throughout the fleet have reaped the benefits of OSC skills training over the past several years, and the sky is the limit. How has OSC training impacted your ship?

New training on the horizon!

Did you read the recent NAVADMIN message regarding updated versions of the Petty Officer Selectee Leadership courses? Great changes are on the horizon, and of course, we at N171 could not be more excited!

NAVADMIN 207/13, released on 28 AUG, shared the incorporation of Operational Stress Control (OSC) and Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) modules as mandatory instruction to newly selected E-4 to E-6 petty officers. Courses affected include: Petty Officer Selectee Leadership Course (POSLC), Petty Officer Second Class Selectee Leadership Course (PO2SLC), and Petty Officer First Class Selectee (PO1SLC) Leadership Course.

“The incorporation of these modules is a terrific accomplishment for our Navy,” commented CAPT Kurt Scott, N171 Resilience Chief. “It’s our perfect opportunity to encourage healthy behaviors and decision-making that our young leaders can emulate throughout the Fleet and within their own families.”

The updated courses are available for viewing and download on Navy Knowledge Online (NKO).

For more information about the Navy’s Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD), visit https://www.netc.navy.mil/centers/cppd.